Cancer Screening

Cancer ScreenWhat Is Cancer Screening?

Inside NCI: A Conversation with Dr. Barry Kramer about Cancer Screening.

Some types of cancer can be found before they cause symptoms. Checking for cancer (or for conditions that may lead to cancer) in people who have no symptoms is called screening. Screening can help doctors find and treat some types of cancer early. Generally, cancer treatment is more effective when the disease is found early. However, not all types of cancer have screening tests. Genetic testing can also offer risk assessment. See bottom of this page for details.

Get more info at the National Cancer Institute.

The American Cancer Society recommends these screening guidelines for most adults.

Breast cancer

  • Yearly mammograms are recommended starting at age 40 and continuing for as long as a woman is in good health
  • Clinical breast exam (CBE) about every 2 years for women in their 20s and 30s and every year for women 40 and over
  • Women should know how their breasts normally look and feel and report any breast change promptly to their health care provider. Breast self-exam (BSE) is an option for women starting in their 20s.
  • Click HERE to learn how to do a breast self-exam.

The American Cancer Society recommends that some women -- because of their family history, a genetic tendency, or certain other factors -- be screened with MRI in addition to mammograms. (The number of women who fall into this category is small: less than 2% of all the women in the US.) Talk with your doctor about your history and whether you should have additional tests at an earlier age. For more information, visit the American Cancer Society website and read Breast Cancer: Early Detection.

Colorectal cancer and polyps

Beginning at age 50, both men and women should follow one of these testing schedules:

Tests that find polyps and cancer

  • Flexible sigmoidoscopy every 5 years*, or
  • Colonoscopy every 10 years, or
  • Double-contrast barium enema every 5 years*, or
  • CT colonography (virtual colonoscopy) every 5 years*

Tests that primarily find cancer

  • Yearly fecal occult blood test (gFOBT)**, or
  • Yearly fecal immunochemical test (FIT) every year**, or
  • Stool DNA test (sDNA), interval uncertain**

* If the test is positive, a colonoscopy should be done.
** The multiple stool take-home test should be used. One test done by the doctor in the office is not adequate for testing. A colonoscopy should be done if the test is positive.

The tests that are designed to find both early cancer and polyps are preferred if these tests are available to you and you are willing to have one of these more invasive tests. Talk to your doctor about which test is best for you.

The American Cancer Society recommends that some people be screened using a different schedule because of their personal history or family history. Talk with your doctor about your history and what colorectal cancer screening schedule is best for you. For more information on colorectal cancer screening, please visit the American Cancer Society and read the article Colorectal Cancer: Early Detection.

Cervical cancer

Cervical cancer screening is an important part of women’s health care. You should start having screening at age 21, regardless of when you first start having sex. How often you should have cervical cancer screening and which tests you should have depend on your age and health history:

  • Women who are 21 to 29 should have a Pap test alone every 3 years. HPV testing alone can be considered for women who are 25 to 29, but Pap tests are preferred.
  • Women who are 30 to 65 have three options for testing. They can have a Pap test and an HPV test (co-testing) every 5 years. They can have a Pap test alone every 3 years. Or they can have HPV testing alone every 5 years.
  • Women can stop having cervical cancer screening after age 65 if:
    • they do not have a history of moderate or severe abnormal cervical cells or cervical cancer AND
    • they have had either three negative Pap test results in a row, two negative HPV tests in a row, or two negative co-test results in a row within the past 10 years. The most recent test should have been performed within the past 3 or 5 years, depending on the type of test. 
    • Women who have had a hysterectomy may still need to have screening. The decision is based on whether the cervix was removed, why the hysterectomy was needed, and whether there is a history of severe cervical cell changes or cervical cancer. Even if the cervix is removed at the time of hysterectomy, cervical cells can still be present at the top of the vagina. If you have a history of cervical cancer or high-grade cervical cell changes, you should continue to have screening for 20 years after the time of your surgery.

Some women – because of their history – may need to have a different screening schedule for cervical cancer.

Please see ACOG and  Cervical Cancer: Prevention and Early Detection for more information.

Information sourced from ACOG guidelines

Endometrial (uterine) cancer

The American Cancer Society recommends that at the time of menopause, all women should be informed about the risks and symptoms of endometrial cancer. Women should report any unexpected bleeding or spotting to their doctors.

Some women -- because of their history -- may need to consider having a yearly endometrial biopsy. Please talk with your doctor about your history.

Cancer-related check-up

For people aged 20 or older having periodic health exams, a cancer-related check-up should include health counseling and, depending on a person’s age and gender, exams for cancers of the thyroid, oral cavity, skin, lymph nodes, testes, and ovaries, as well as for some non-malignant (non-cancerous) diseases.

Source: American Cancer Society

Take control of your health and reduce your cancer risk.

  • Stay away from tobacco.
  • Stay at a healthy weight.
  • Get moving with regular physical activity.
  • Eat healthy with plenty of fruits and vegetables.
  • Limit how much alcohol you drink (if you drink at all).
  • Protect your skin.
  • Know yourself, your family history, and your risks.
  • Have regular check-ups and cancer screening tests.
  • Complete a hereditary screening form HERE and discuss it with your provider. (See more information below.)

Genetic Testing for Cancer Risk

Myriad

Myriad’s Genetic Testing website – https://myriad.com/myrisk/

Real patient story about Breast Cancer – Ashley Dedmon  - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lLLu2iQ12HA

 What is myRisk? https://myriad.com/patients-families/your-questions-about-disease/whats-my-risk/

 Benefits of genetic testing: https://myriad.com/patients-families/genetic-testing-101/benefits-of-genetic-testing/

 Hereditary Cancer resources: https://myriad.com/patients-families/hereditary-cancer-risk/

 

3 minute short video clip explaining hereditary cancer & myRisk https://myriad.com/myrisk/patient-education/

Myriad FAQs:

  1. How much will this cost?
  2. Why does a doctor need to order this for me?
  3. What are the potential outcomes of the test and their impact on me?
  4. Can the MyRisk test determine if I have cancer?
  5. When will I receive my results?

https://myriad.com/patients-families/hereditary-cancer-risk/?utm_source=home

Myriad info

LOCATION

Advanced Women's Healthcare
2111 E Oakland Avenue, Suite B
Bloomington, IL 61701
Phone: 309-808-3068
Fax: (309) 808-3072

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Saturday: Closed
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